Tag Archives: digital scanners

The surprise Uniden package, that is not a surprise.

Well there you go!

A few months ago a popular scanner supplier and its associated web site Universal Radio based in the United States posted a page with a tantalising photo of the then purported Uniden SDS100 Bearcar. Scanner and communication forums in some parts of the world went into overdrive with a mixture of excitement, resentment, scepticism and assumptions.

Then just like that the page posted by Universal Radio was removed, but not before some folks had grabbed what information they could (which was little) and the image and hosted it on their own sites. Uniden through Paul Opitz (UPMan) made a brief comment regarding the SDS100 on Radio Reference which stated the following;

1) BCD436HP is still in production.

2) What was posted was an inaccurate and incomplete page from a PowerPoint of possible new product concepts. If it comes to fruition, I can guarantee that it will have some features not mentioned and will not have several features that were mentioned…and will have significant differences in appearance from what was posted.

3) Uniden did not intentionally leak this. It was unsanctioned and pulled from a page that included several important disclaimers.

4) If you contact Uniden Support, they will have absolutely no more information than you see in this post and in the leaked information. So, leave them alone, please.

5) I intend for this to be my only post regarding this matter.

The purported Uniden SDS100 image originally released by Universal Radio & that got some hearts racing.

Point 1 was made in relation to the numerous, obviously incorrect, comments, stating this meant the end of production of the 436HP series with some stating production had already ceased and there was minimal stock left. Point 3 was made in relation to the conspiracy theorists who saw what had transpired from the initial release of the image and information until its ‘mysterious’ removal, many saw it all as some sort of marketing ploy by Uniden.

What struck me was point 2, it obviously gave scanner enthusiasts hope. Maybe we should all look at Paul Opitz as the Obi-Wan Kenobi of the scanner world? Providing some hope and a glimpse of what could one day be from an old force, that being Uniden.

Fast forward a few months and Paul Opitz through his usual Jedi like coded mind tricks and through the magical power of his avatars began hinting at something. Then on Monday 19th March, 2018 Uniden announced the SDS100 albeit looking a little different, just a bit, from the original image posted that caused a stir initially. Here’s what has been posted so far on the new unit.

Uniden SDS100 pre-production model. Click for a larger image.

Some exciting things to note initially regarding this unit is the radio is based on Software Defined Radio technology, the ‘True I/Q’ and the fact it meets IS4 (IPX4) standards for water resistance. The 8 GB microSD card reader can actually handle up to a 32 GB microSD card.

At present UPMan is making some very big claims regarding the abilities of this scanner to receive and decode signals where its current x36HP series appears to struggle and only time will tell if this is true or he’s simply selling his product. He has been kind enough to provide video links via Radio Reference of both units working side by side for comparison.

Not too sure how owners of the current x36HP series will feel about those boasts. I’d imagine some would be quite peeved. In reality the x36HP were a leap forward in some areas and these new SDS100 are whole new era and leap forward again, so you’d have to expect improvements having been made when compared to your 2013/2014 units, it’s 2018 people, things advance. (Except with Uniden Australia apparently, come on folks win us back! ).

Close up view of the SDS100 display.

The new unit, like it’s predecessors (can we even call them that yet?) x36HP series, will have paid upgrades available to it over time to permit reception of;
– MotoTRBO Capacity + and Connect +
– DMR Tier III
– Hytera XPT
– Single-Channel DMR
– NXDN 4800 and 9600
– EDACS ProVoice
The big thing to note with the above is that the upgrade options may not be available at the time of release of the scanner itself. So even if you get your hands on one of these in the early stages just remember you may need to wait for a period of time until you can monitor the above on it. (Us Aussies and Kiwis are VERY used to waiting..and waiting…and waiting..and waiting).

In plain text for everyone, here are some of the initial specifications at the present time, it should be noted that actual production units may vary slightly.

  • Customizable Color Display
  • Trunktracker X
  • APCO P25 Phase I and II
  • Motorola, EDACS, and LTR Trunking
  • MotoTRBO Capacity + and Connect +**
  • DMR Tier III**
  • Hytera XPT**
  • Single-Channel DMR**
  • NXDN 4800 and 9600**
  • EDACS ProVoice**
  • Location-Based Scanning
  • USA/Canada Radio Database
  • ZIP Code Selection for Easy Setup
  • Close Call™ RF Capture with Do Not Disturb
  • 8 GB microSD
  • Soft Keys for Intelligent UI
  • Recording, Playback, and Replay
  • Temporary Avoid
  • Fire Tone-Out Alert
  • System Analysis and Discovery
  • CTCSS/DCS/NAC/RAN/Color Code Decoding
  • S.A.M.E. Weather Alert
  • Enhanced Dynamic Memory
  • Preemptive Trunking Priority
  • Fully Customizable Scanning with your own Favorites Lists
  • Backlit Keypad
  • Channel Volume Offset
  • PC Programming and Control
  • USB Connectivity and Charging
  • Weekly Database Updates
  • Free Sentinel Software keeps the SDS100 database and memory up to date
  • Up to 8 Hours Operation on included LiIon Battery
  • Frequency Coverage:
    • 25-512 MHz
    • 758-824 MHz
    • 849-869 MHz
    • 894-960 MHz
    • 1240-1300 MHz

*Note that this item has not yet received FCC approvals and may not be offered for sale.
** Paid Upgrade required. Upgrade might not be available upon initial release.

I’ll refrain from getting to wound up about the whole lack of support, upgrades and business politics we Aussies and Kiwis seem to continuously suffer from with our local UBCD436PT and UBCD536PT units. It’s just plain ridiculous, frustrating and frankly quite pathetic. Maybe this new unit might turn things around for us? (Who’s that laughing?!?)

I have always liked my Uniden scanners, however I’ve refrained from purchasing a x36HP or its local variant in part because of the above. Such was my frustration I actually purchased a Whistler TRX-1 via Zip Scanners (they were great to deal with) in the US and have thoroughly enjoyed getting what I can out of that. Both Zip Scanners and Whistler Group I feel have been very supportive, and I know I’m not the only one locally who thinks that. But I have to admit the new unit form Uniden looks the goods and has me interested, even more so if they start delivering on some the upgrade packages.

Whistler Group have hinted at something possibly around May.

The Uniden SDS100 looks great so far Uniden. For those interested a manual is available here: Uniden SDS100

Below are some of the videos UPMan has been kind enough to share. Although I’m sure some will accuse him of teasing us with them.



General news, updates and other observations.

Firstly let me commence by wishing you all a Merry Christmas, I hope you haven’t had to release your belt notch out to far as you recover from your food induced comas.

There has been quite a bit happening of late, and sadly for myself not much in the way of scanning due to a work promotion and the arrival of child no.2 four months ago.

Victoria Police rural communications update.

Back in August 2015 we reported on how Victoria Police was to migrate from their existing VHF Voting Network to a new system. You can read that particular article here: The AOR AR-DV1 & encryption looming for Victoria Police rural communications.

2008_04_16_P4058788CMax
Telstra has won the contract to supply and maintain radios and related equipment for Victoria Police in rural areas. The project will provide encrypted communications for all Police operations in those areas and give country based Police the security their big city brother and sisters have enjoyed for over 10 years now. Image courtesy of Chris Maxwell.

Last week it was announced that Telstra had won the contract to supply, install and maintain the new radios as part of a seven year deal. As many had speculated and advised, Victoria Police rural communications will migrate to the RMR Network and be encrypted.

Telstra in partnership with Motorola supplied and installed the RMR Network, initially for the Country Fire Authority, although there has always been plans to open the network up to other government users as part of a much bigger plan to lessen the amount of systems used by ESO’s and related entities.

As to which radio will be supplied that is still open to speculation and I understand there has been some evaluations being undertaken. News reports advise more than 8000 radios for Victoria Police, Victoria State Emergency Services, Life Saving Victoria and Corrections Victoria will be rolled out as part of the deal.

A news release from Premier Andrews states the following;

The Andrews Labor Government is replacing outdated and unsafe police and emergency services radios to help them safely and effectively fight crime and respond to emergencies.Minister for Police Lisa Neville and Minister for Emergency Services James Merlino today announced a seven-year contract with Telstra to upgrade police and emergency services radio equipment.

The new radio equipment will replace outdated analogue systems with new secure, encrypted digital equipment providing better voice clarity, coverage and the capability to track the location of devices, improving member safety and response times.

Importantly, the new radios will stop communications being intercepted by the public through a smartphone app or scanner.

The contract delivers on an election commitment and provides more than 8000 radios for Victoria Police, Victoria State Emergency Services, Life Saving Victoria and Corrections Victoria, and can be expanded to provide radio support services for other Government agencies.

Work is underway upgrading the radio towers with further work on key base infrastructure in early next year enabling the roll out of the in car and hand held radios from middle of 2017.

The Labor Government invested $11.5 million in the 2015/16 Victorian State Budget for police to upgrade to the new digital system, with further funding realised through efficiencies made by moving to the new digital system.

The Minister for Police Lisa Neville was quoted as saying; “After four years of inaction by the former Liberal Government we’ve got on with the job of delivering for country police and ensuring they have the modern resources they need to catch criminals safely and effectively.”

“The safety of Victorian Police is our highest priority and we’re making sure that the public can’t listen in on police operations and they have the right tools to catch criminals.”

Whilst the Minister for Emergency Services James Merlino said; “We’re providing our emergency services personnel with the resources they need to effectively respond to emergencies and keep Victorians safe.”

“This sophisticated technology is more secure, has better voice clarity, will reduce the risk of communication failures and improve safety for our emergency services personnel and the community.”

I’d be expecting a dual band radio, particularly for the Police, to permit operation on both the RMR Network (VHF) and the MMR Network (UHF). The same may be a possibility for the State Emergency Service, and whilst not mentioned in recent reports also Ambulance Victoria. This would fix some of the issues raised from the Royal Commission in to the Black Saturday fires of 2009 relating to radio supply and operation of such by Victoria Police members sent to assist.

In short vehicles from Metropolitan areas with MMR radios fitted were obviously useless in the rural area where there were no MMR towers and in some cases the Officers were supplied rural radios to use instead yet were unfamiliar with the radio type and its operation. Time will tell.

If the transition to the RMR Network for country police is anything like that to the MMR Network, well over 10 years ago, for their big city brothers and sisters then I’d be expecting the old existing network to run parallel to their allocations on the RMR Network for a period of time. Then we’d probably see the old VHF Voting allocations ‘re-tooled’ then possibly absorbed in to the RMR Network for use. Much like they did with the old 467/468/469MHz UHF allocations on the MMR Network.

Uniden Australia, Pacific Telecommunications, the UBCD436-PT / UBCD536-PT & BCD325P2-AU.

So as many who are familiar with the above mentioned units these are not sold directly by Uniden Australia, they are instead sold under licence by Pacific Telecommunications and are the ‘local’ version of the BCD436HP & BCD536HP units sold by Uniden America.

Many would also be familiar how there was no real set plan to release local units initially by Uniden Australia, for whatever reason or debate, until came the time the Country Fire Authority set about wanting to replace some widely used Motorola branded ‘listening sets’ (scanner damn it!) used by its members. The consideration for such units for its members was due to the CFA’s migration to the RMR Network and EOI’s were called. From that ‘local’ versions of the BCD#36HP units were born, with the expected UBCD prefix.

There was an embargo date put in place until the public could obtain a unit, one would suspect to ensure CFA members wanting a unit had first preference. I’m told this was not the case, but no real explanation or reasoning has ever been provided for the date embargo.

So now we come to the reason of my touching on the above units again.

Uniden America some time ago released a paid DMR upgrade option of its BCD#36 family of units (May 2017 article). Now earlier this month Uniden America also announced the same upgrade option for its BCD996P2 and BCD325P2 units.

bcd325p2-au
The BCD325P2-AU shown here retains the ‘BCD’ prefix of US units, a move away from the usual ‘UBCD’ we’re used to seeing locally. Instead the units designation in ends in ‘AU’, obviously denoting Australia. (Image supplied courtesy of Jim of Ozscan).

Whilst the BCD996P2 was never released on the market here in Australia or New Zealand the BCD325P2 was released locally as the BCD325P2-AU.

bcd325p2-au-b
A simplistic label on the rear of the BCD325P2-AU is the only visible means to denote that the unit differs slightly from the US BCD325P2 units. (Image supplied courtesy of Jim of Ozscan).

We, like some others, are assured that Uniden Australia are negotiating and working behind the scenes to procure and release the paid DMR upgrade option for the UBCD436-PT and UBCD536-PT units, there has been no mention if this will include an upgrade path for the BCD325P2-AU.

While we’re discussing the ability to upgrade units to DMR capable units Uniden, can we please sort out that ridiculous issue  Australian owners of US units have faced that in order to procure the upgrade option you have to have a credit card registered to a US address. Absolutely ridiculous and not ideal at all, whilst some have found a way around the issue (virtual credit cards and the like) it just simply is not good enough.

If the whole credit card fiasco is due to limiting potential exposure to credit card fraud I think you may find the US leads Australia in credit fraud. A recent Nilson Report confirms this and goes on to state; ‘the U.S. currently accounts for 47% of global credit and debit card fraud even though it generates only 27% of the total volume of purchases and cash’. But I digress, it is what is.

ACMA Online Database ‘warning’ note.

I recently visited the ACMA online database to quickly chase something up and noted a ‘warning’ has appeared on the search page. acma_logo

Visitors to the page are now seeing this: ‘WARNING: Searching Assignments by Site Postcodes or Site Postcode ranges is now deprecated. [See explanation on this Help Page]’.

When you visit the help page a further explanation is provided and states;

‘Postcode information is no longer being added for new Sites or maintained for existing Sites and current Register searches that allow searching Sites by postcodes or postcode ranges are now deprecated in this Register. Register searches that allow searching Sites by postcodes will be removed from the Register in the near future and replaced with an alternative search.’

Whilst I’m not sure what the ‘Sites Postcodes’ or ‘Site Postcode’ search function will be replaced with it will be a shame if it gets replaced with something that isn’t as informative or is open to interpretation. There are already a few ways to ‘hide’ allocations and it will be a shame if another one creeps in.

Whistler releases TRX-1 & TRX-2 scanners with DMR.

Greetings yet again,

Well within hours of our posting our last blog article regarding Uniden’s announcement of their plans to introduce a DMR capability to their existing top-tier range of scanners Whistler fired back with an announcement of their own.

Whistler TRX-1 Handheld (a)
Presenting the TRX-1 with DMR, looking very much like its predecessor the WS1088.

Whistler plan on not only offering an upgrade option for several of their existing units, just like Uniden, but have also announced two new unit types, those being the TRX-1 handheld with a case looking very much like the existing WS1088 and a desktop/mobile version in the TRX-2 looking much like the WS1098 the ‘TRX’ denoting ‘Turbo Receive’.

Whistler Group is also offering a free upgrade of the two new units to include NXDN monitoring which is currently under development and expected to be available at this stage towards the end of the year.

The existing unit types that will be offered a free DMR upgrade are the WS1080, WS1088, WS1095 and the WS1098.

The upgrade to the existing unit line will be available by Whistler’s EZ Scan PC application later this month. That is a very generous offer in my opinion!

The new units, along with the existing ones when they receive the DMR upgrade, will be able to monitor the following DMR protocols;

Conventional DMR (entered as a DMR trunked system);
Hytera XPT;
MotoTRBO™ Capacity Plus;
MotoTRBO™ Connect Plus;
MotoTRBO™ Linked Capacity Plus.

Of course there is also the expected APCO P25 Phase I and II, Motorola, EDACS and LTR.

Whistler TRX-2 Deskktop-Mobile
The TRX-2 from Whistler Group.
Whistler TRX-1 -TRX-2 & WS1098
Whistler shows of the hardware at Hamvention 2016.

As for the cost of the two new units on offer that already come with DMR and will be offered a free NXDN upgrade when available the following has been announced by Whistler, the TRX-1 Handheld is listed as $649.00 (USD) and the TRX-2 Desktop/Mobile is listed as $729.00 (USD).

At the current USD to AUD exchange rate (for Sunday 22nd May, 2016) we’re looking at approximately $899.01 for the TRX-1 and $1009.84 for the TRX-2.

Whistler has the new TRX-1 and TRX-2 models in transit to suppliers as we type this with units expected to be available for purchase in June, 2016.

Uniden announces DMR capability for BCD536HP & BCD436HP series.

imagesUniden America has finally announced it plans to introduce the ability to monitor DMR systems, including Motorola’s MotoTRBO. HOORAY!

The ability to monitor the aforementioned protocol will at this stage only be offered on their flagship range of scanners, those being the BCD536HP and BCD436HP models. Now whether that includes the Australian versions in the local Pacific Telecommunications variants, the UBCD436-PT & UBCD536-PT which was offered to Victorian CFA members, I’m unsure. I don’t see any reason why it couldn’t, but remember, don’t count your chickens before they hatch.

Those familiar with my ramblings on this blog may recall how disappointed I was when these units were announced back in November, 2013 without the ability to monitor DMR, along with NXDN. (https://vicradiozone.com/2013/11/17/uniden-bcd436hp-bcd536hp-offically-launched/) Given how rapidly DMR usage has grown in numerous countries I found its lack of inclusion perplexing.

The ability for the aforementioned units to monitor DMR will come as a firmware upgrade for a cost, just as Uniden did recently with its ‘ProVoice’ upgrade for EDACS systems.

Uniden has also announced that early subscribers for the firmware upgrade option will receive said upgrade at a cost of $50.00 (USD). No word yet on what the final cost would be for those who don’t take up the ‘early bird’ special.

Should you choose to take Uniden up on their paid firmware upgrade offer your unit would then have the following protocols open to it;

Existing – Conventional Analog channels
Existing – Conventional P25 Digital channels
Existing – Motorola Type I and Type II Trunked Radio systems with Analog and Digital (P25) Voice
Existing – EDACS Analog trunked radio systems
Existing – LTR Analog trunked radio systems
Existing – APCO Project 25 Phase I and Phase II Digital Trunked Radio systems
Existing – EDACS trunked radio systems + Upgrade Option – with ProVoice channels (paid ProVoice upgrade required)
Upgrade Option – Conventional Digital Mobile Radio (DMR) channels (paid DMR upgrade required)
Upgrade Option – MotoTRBO Capacity Plus Trunked Radio systems (paid DMR upgrade required)
Upgrade Option – MotoTRBO Connect Plus Trunked Radio Systems (paid DMR upgrade required)

I can’t help but feel there were a few clues offered on the net that this may have finally been happening. One of those is an email that was initially doing the rounds on a certain YahooGroup which was later to be deleted from the groups servers. However it had been seen by several people before its removal and the author of said email discussed some DMR results on his BCD436HP.

Secondly was Paul Opitz seeking some assistance in using DSD+ on RadioReference. Perhaps to check some data, compare results, and identify where to seek various DMR data string characteristics such as Digital Colour Codes and such?

Lastly was the recent addition of the EDACS ProVoice upgrade, I started to suspect that if they could do that with these units, there may be more looming. Guess we’ll have to stay tuned for the NXDN upgrade huh?

A big congratulations to Uniden on finally getting this option in to some of it units. I think it is long overdue and a fantastic addition to their units.

Hamvention is coming up and with it was the expectation Uniden were set to announce something special, perhaps the early announcement is to get the jump on Whistler Group who are also expected to make some sort of announcement.

You can read more details about Uniden’s announcement here: http://info.uniden.com/twiki/bin/view/UnidenMan4/DigitalMobileRadioUpgrade

A funny thing happened on the way to the forum

Hello yet again readers and fellow hobbyists!

First off some news snippets to keep and eye on;

  • CSE Crosscom looks to have increased the capacity of its Connect Plus system in Victoria. I noted an increase in channel capacity from 18 channels (2 slots each frequency, so was 36 total) to 24 channels (2 slots each, so now 48 in total) recently and also noted was a new peer site (1-70). The site ID doesn’t seem to really follow the existing site ID’s of 1-31, 1-32, 1-33, etc, etc for Victoria, so not entirely sure what the go is there.
  • Uniden America and the Whistler Group look as they may both making some announcements at the Dayton Hamvention on the 20th-22nd of May 2016. Let’s not kid ourselves, we all know what we want to see!
  • The new site detected for the RMR Network in Morwell has been confirmed as showing a site ID of 0399. Thanks to Mark and Firescan for the confirmation. I guess we should keep an eye out for further sites given the future plans of the RMR Network.

Where did the forums go?

To be honest I got tired real quick of some of the issues, funnily enough some of them touched on by Russell in the article presented below. Whilst I was happy to provide a platform for people to use I can’t say I was overwhelmed by the amount of people sharing, investigating, following up, etc. Also the conduct of some left a lot to be desired. We actually seemed to have people being more polite to each other when I had the comments open on the blogs pages. There may might be something in the future to replace the forums, but for now, I really can’t give the time to also make sure all the ‘kiddies are playing nice in the sandpit’.

Having said that about the forums, to those that did participate and act civil I thank you. You won’t be forgotten should something else appear.

Now for the good stuff!

Our last article featured a few words by Russell Bryant and a bit of a ‘look back in time’ with an old article of Russell’s which first appeared in October 2000 in a now long gone magazine known as “Radio & Communications”. Well we’re lucky to again have a few of Russell’s words and thoughts. (No, seriously, we are!)

I suspect some may take offence and frankly I don’t really care, otherwise I wouldn’t have bothered posting the article. There are many people on various forums need to wake up to themselves and take in the ‘bigger picture’ on a few issues. Furthermore they need to understand there are many in the hobby that just might know a little bit more than they do on how the world works and how various entities (such as Governments) do indeed think and what they’re working towards.

If there is one thing I’ve learned in not only my various hobbies, and work and life, is YOU NEVER STOP LEARNING!

Don’t get me wrong, we’re not here to insult people, but as many would know the old ‘hug and kiss’ approach doesn’t work on everyone, hence I guess you could say the reason for the harsher tones. So I guess we could also invoke the old saying ‘if the hat fits’.

IN THE BEGINNING…

It is no secret. I have been around the hobby of scanning for a long time. I have seen the progression of receivers from tunable sets with limited coverage and as much selectivity (the ability of a device to respond to a particular frequency without interference from others) as a house brick, through to crystal sets then to the modern digital trunk tracking scanners of today. Adjunct to these advances in technology has been the need and desire to determine who a particular user is on the thousands of radio frequencies in use across Australia. Back when the earth was still cooling and I purchased my first synthesised scanner, (the mid 1970’s just for the record), there was no reliable source of frequency information. You used your detectives’ skills or other methods to confirm a user. When a frequency was confirmed, you kept it very much to yourself or if you did share it, it was only amongst a few of your most trusted friends.

BIRTH OF THE FREQUENCY GUIDE…

The Australian Radio Frequency Handbook was very popular.

Later on in the early 1980’s a number of frequency guides were produced but they were crude to say the least. Based on personal and individual loggings they were poorly vetted and rarely verified, but we bought them in their hundreds because that was all that was available.  One such publication was Dick Smith’s Australian Radio Frequency Handbook written by Jack McDonald.

Later in the 1980’s the then Department of Communications released under the provisions of the Freedom of Information Act a series of microfiche slides detailing almost every frequency assignment across the country. If you had the money to buy a microfiche reader and the slides, then you had access to a plethora of information beyond your wildest dreams. As a result the FOI documents spawned another run of frequency guides, this time a little more accurate but nevertheless incomplete. Again we bought them without reservation.

Before anyone says anything, yes I must declare an interest in several of these guides, compiled in my name as well as several non de plumes.

Railscan Monitoring The Railways (Series 3). Just one of several publications compiled and released by Russell Bryant.

THE FORUM IS FORMED…

Okay so where is this all leading? Well I am glad you asked. For those of us with dates of birth before the 1970’s, you will probably remember Shortwave Possums Bulletin Board managed by Patrick McDonald. It was one of, if not the first attempt at an ‘internet’ based forum. A collective, where like-minded people could meet and exchange information. Sounds like a dating site! There were various ‘rooms’ that members could enter each catering to your particular bent, whether it was shortwave, HF utility monitoring or VHF/UHF services. It is safe to say this was the beginning of the modern forum that many of us join today.

From a personal point of view I am a member of two dozens radio-based forums, both here and overseas. Again it is probably safe to say that the scanning forums have exploded across the web, providing a valuable resource. Or have they?

Without naming any forum or individual, it might be argued that the forum is destroying not enhancing the hobby. How could this be? Rather easy when you consider the forum provides a certain degree (not 100 percent grant you) of anonymity, whereby users can post information and opinions without their identity being known. Of course the more you post, the more likely it is that you will reveal yourself.

THE DOWN HILL SLIDE…

This anonymity is the basis for many to post information obtained from official or semi official sources, with little regard for the ramifications. Generally speaking commercial and government users do not like details of their radio communications systems posted across the web for all to see and monitor. And before anyone says the information is ‘publicly available’ on ACMA, which of course is true, ACMA doesn’t provide details of how the frequencies are used or technical data such as CTCSS and DCS tone or colour codes etc. It is this that incurs the displeasure of most communication users. Some posters adopt the attitude of ‘tough luck’, or indeed if they didn’t post it someone else will. Might I suggest that this cavalier approach is the very reason some radio users are moving to encryption?

By way of example, a well-known overseas forum was asked by a law enforcement agency not to rebroadcast their radio traffic via a stream (something I will talk about later). The forum in question declined the department’s request citing freedom of speech provisions of their constitution. The police agency in question simply encrypted their radio signals. Naturally this was criticised by those listeners affected by the switch but understandable from the department’s point of view, either way the hobby loses.

Okay so that might be a single example amongst the thousands, if not hundreds of thousands of posts made every day across the world. Or is it? Not being privy to the machinations of management of some of our agencies, it is conceivable to say that availability of scanners and the amount of information freely available on forums is one, maybe not the primary reason, that some government agencies and private companies decide to encrypt. It is correct to say that the scanner user is not, in this day and age, the main reason why radio frequency assignees decide to encrypt, it is however an element and the forum by virtue of its existence also a factor.

GET OUT THE SOAPBOX…

rantIn the past if you wanted to voice your opinion about anything, you took yourself off to Sydney’s Domain or to the central stairway outside the State Library on Swanston Street in Melbourne. Today it is as simple as logging into your favourite scanner forum and venting your spleen about everything and anything without regard to the facts or people involved, usually hiding behind an obscure username.

Often the topic is little more than a pet grievance that the poster has, with the loss of a particular service to encryption the most popular subject. Allegations of hiding misdeeds or inappropriate actions by these agencies from the public usually surface as the reason. Of course criminal activities, security threats and officer safety are not considered. It is to stop scanner users from listening in when we are bored. As far as this correspondent is concerned the sooner the police fully encrypt the sooner these posters will get tired and move onto something else.

ROW YOUR BOAT GENTLY DOWN THE STREAM…

A few years back someone worked out that if you connected your scanner to a computer, had the computer permanently on-line people thousands of kilometres away could monitor radio activity without the need for scanner themselves. This new-found technological marvel became known as streaming. Today you can listen to just about anything anywhere from your home PC, laptop, tablet or smart phone.

Today you can listen to just about anything anywhere from your home PC, laptop, tablet or smart phone.

Forums are a common source of streams and as such anyone not really interested in scanning or scanners can monitor radio traffic from a multitude of radio users. The problem here is simple, instead of a couple of hundred at the most monitors, the potential is thousands, which during a major emergency or significant event could cause confusion or even a hazardous situation. A sudden influx of sticky beaks or rubber neckers is the last thing emergency services need. I suppose the burning issue is, can forums be held responsible for this happening? I submit they can and should.

HAVE FENCE, WILL SIT…

As part of this examination of forums, a survey was conducted on an Australian scanner forum of its member numbers and contributions. The results are interesting to say the least. The forum has 289 members, of which 151 have not posted a single message. Ninety-nine users have posted less than 100 messages, 20 have posted less than 500 messages, five members have posted less than 1000 messages and finally only three members have posted greater than 1000 messages. The forum has been in existence for nearly eight years.

Okay so there is no law against not posting, but as demonstrated above less than 7 percent of members are actively and regularly supporting the forum. The trouble starts when someone joins a forum then proceeds to suck up all the information posted but contributes none. Hardly a balanced state of affairs.

Alternatively some members post something like, “Can someone give me all the frequencies for Kickatinalong?” A quick check of their joining date normally reveals they became a member less than 48 hours previously. Again the norm rather than the exception.

It can of course be argued that a newcomer has not yet gathered the necessary data so as to reciprocate with frequency information. A proviso if I may. Anyone who knows me will know that I am the last person to discourage anyone or push them away from the hobby, but it is, generally speaking, not the done thing to join a forum and your first message is give, give and give. An introduction might be nice or have we forgotten basic etiquette in this day and age?

OTHER FORUM MISDEMEANOURS…

old-man-shapI normally do not read owners’ manuals or user guides, so now it’s a little ‘there but for the grace of god go I’ time. However there seems to be a growing practise amongst many, to buy a new scanner, have trouble programming it or indeed using it and then go immediately to press on a forum. The end result is usually one of two things. A plea seeking help to program the radio and or criticise it saying that it is a lemon and not performing as it should.

In the vast majority of situations a little time reading the manual will generally take care of both scenarios. Dare I say, there is usually someone crazy enough to spend many hours providing a step by step guide in an attempt to resolve the issue. And yes I am guilty of being crazy enough to spend many hours providing a step by step guide in an attempt to resolve the issue. However, the first question I ask now is, “Have you read the user guide?” If the answer is No, then goodbye. If you are not prepared to help yourself, then don’t expect members of a forum to help you.

AND SO IT CONTINUES…

Australia has an adult literacy rate around 99% and regularly scores among the top five of thirty major developed countries. About 58% of Australians aged from 25 to 64 have vocational or tertiary qualifications we also have a tertiary graduation rate of 49% is the highest among OECD countries. Further 38 percent of Australia’s population has a university or college degree, which is among the highest percentages in the world.

To read some of the posts on the various local forums you would consider the figures quoted above to be fanciful. I will again pre-empt any comments by saying I make no claim to being a literary giant or indeed a great scholar. I would like to think that I can string a few words together that make sense, which are spelt correctly and have a degree of syntax about them. This does not appear to be the case with some posts made on forums. Punctuation, spelling, proper nouns and sentence structure appear to be inconsequential. Anyone attempting to raise the standard is usually dismissed as a crank or some sort of grammar police.

Radio related terms are not immune either. Some of the more glaring technical errors are, frequencies spelt frequencys, MHz shown as mhz and kHz written as khz. Overall a poor show by a hobby that wants to be taken seriously.

I am not sure of just how long it has been, but SMS or Texting has been an integral part of our lifestyle for a while now. For a number of reasons, texting developed its own vocabulary and abbreviations. Which is all well and good when you are limited by message sizes and message tariffs, but why, why has this inane practise migrated across to posts on scanner forums? God knows it is hard enough to understand the context of some post without adding things like, BUMP or a full stop, nothing else just a full stop. For those of us who spent the vast majority of our lives without mobile phones have a heart. Say what you mean, don’t use a series of hieroglyphics or non descript symbols. You never know it might actually improve your vocabulary and verbal skills.

FINALLY…

As you can see, a number of issues have been raised in this ramble. Some of a personal nature while others are shared with a couple of other grumpy old men acquaintances of mine. The underlying text is that while forums on the surface appear to be a benefit to the hobby, the argument could be made that they are destroying it. No doubt this will generate comment and criticism, feel free. Maybe I could start the anti forum forum?

Russell Bryant

Fell free to have your say in the comments section below. It’s fine to disagree, but seriously, do it nicely!

The AOR AR-DV1 & encryption looming for Victoria Police rural communications.

It has been some time since our last article and needless to say plenty has been happening.

AOR AR-DV1

AOR launched their AOR AR-DV1 Receiver. In the following weeks there appeared to be mixed reviews on various forums as to the performance of the receiver.

The receiver covers the following digital modes;
– D-Star Narrowband only. Data mode not supported.
– Alinco Only with digital unit EJ-47U (Voice mode F1E)
– Yaesu V/D mode only
– Digital CR AMBE+2 systems only
– NXDN 6.25KHz mode only
– dPMR dPMR446 and Tier 1 mode only.
– P25 Unencrypted and conventional mode only.
– DMR Tier 1 and Tier modes only unencrypted.

Some of the initial performance concerns appear to have been rectified by subsequent firmware updates, however some users still appear aggrieved by the lack of certain functionality and information not displayed on certain modes they’d expect to be able to see, such as colour codes and slot usage details.

As expected there is no ability to follow trunking networks built-in to the unit. This may eventually follow suit with some other AOR products in that an ‘add on option’ can be installed at some point though.

Whilst on the subject of trunking, please stop using as an excuse that this is a ‘receiver’ and not a ‘scanner’ as an argument for the lack of built-in trunking ability. That has never been an argument of any great strength for many years now.

Whilst I have yet to use one of these receivers myself I’m unable to comment on how it would handle local conditions here in Australia. I do think we need to give credit to AOR though for creating such a unit in this format that takes the initial steps in having available a unit on the market that can cover some of the modes that are growing in use.

I know here in my hometown of Melbourne, some of those modes are widespread and continue to grow in use.

Some of those modes have been in use for some time now and it was hoped we’d see them in Uniden’s BCD436HP and BCD536HP, however some, me for one, were left disappointed when they weren’t.

vrz-aor-ar-dv1-vrz
AOR have announced the AR-DV1 which delivers the ability to monitor DMR and NXDN, but without the ability to trunk track.

So whilst the AR-DV1 appears to have its faults at least it is providing hope and we know they’re working on it. Hopefully Uniden are now spurred on a little and are working on making our dreams come true? Please, pretty please?

Victoria Police rural operations to be encrypted by 2017

By far the biggest news in Victoria for the scanning hobbyist is that Victoria Police are moving to an encrypted communications system for its rural operations.

Whilst it was inevitable, I can’t help but feel we have only ourselves in part to blame for the decision to hasten the project so it happens sooner rather than later.

The planned move to an encrypted communications network will mean that Victorian Police Officers based in rural country areas will finally have secure communications, well over 10 years since their metropolitan & greater Geelong area brothers and sisters were afforded such a system in the Metropolitan Mobile Radio (MMR) Network.

Whilst Victoria Police started planning long ago for the replacement of its existing analogue VHF Voting Network, and its accompanying access to the StateNet Mobile Radio (SMR) Network based on MPT1327 trunking protocols, it received a massive boost in momentum during the last election.

2008_09_09_IMG_6534CMaxwell

Over recent years there has been an increase in unauthorised, and lets face it, moronic, individuals programming transmit capable equipment and either blocking Police Officers transmissions or simply swearing, playing music, challenging and insulting Police as they attempt to go about their duties.

All the above are issues that were once also encountered by Police Officers in the Metropolitan areas when they utilised the old National UHF 64 Channel allocation. However the issue of unauthorised users on the network was virtually eradicated once they moved to the MMR Network as each radio needs to be ‘authorised’ to access the system and in order to be able to transmit on it.

The other matter that has caused great concern amongst Officers is the emergence of numerous Smartphone apps that stream webcasts of individual’s scanner streams, which in most instances will include the Victoria Police frequencies.

There are some who would argue this is no different to carrying a portable scanner about, however it is obvious there is a little more to it in that Smartphone’s are used by a far greater number of the general public than what scanners are and as such there would be a hell of a lot more people now with access to Police communications.

The above matter was really bought to the fore during one particular Police incident, a pursuit in October 2014.

The pursuit lasting several hours, involving at least 4 carjackings and involving at one point as many as 30 Police vehicles, 2 Police helicopters and covered some 300 odd kilometers was listened to by nearly 9,000 people according to some media reports and statements. It has been stated in that most of those listeners were on Smartphone apps, however we need to acknowledge somewhere in there was a scanner or SDR dongle feeding those apps. Also it could be argued that a fair amount of those 9,000 listeners were also listening to via the comfort of the internet stream on their work and home computer.

Whatever way you try to group or breakdown the figures, it was a lot of listeners for one incident and doesn’t include the bloke in his radio shack, truck, car, or lounge room with a scanner.

Victoria went to the elections in November 2014 and with it a promise by Labor to give country Police secure communications. In short Labor won, and shortly thereafter the announcement that the wheels of encryption were turning a little faster. Labor announced in the 2015 budget $11.5 million in new funding and Victoria Police announced the 2007_02_04_P4028685CMaxwellredirection $23.8 million from their existing budget and planned upkeep of the existing radio network, as well as funds they’d been allocating to any new proposed system they were looking to build for the future.

It is planned for the new system to be implemented in its entirety by January 2017.

It is speculated we will in essence see an expanded Rural Mobile Radio (RMR) Network. This network was initially built for and is currently managed by the Country Fire Authority on behalf of the State Government. Eventually the management of this network will pass to the Emergency Services Telecommunications Authority (ESTA) just as the MMR Network.

It is envisaged that other Government entities, such as the SES, Ambulance Victoria (Rural), Corrections Victoria as well as Surf Life Saving Victoria will also access the RMR Network.

The RMR Network is identical to the MMR Network albeit based on VHF frequencies as opposed to UHF which is what the MMR utilises. Both share the same system ID and are based on P25 protocols.

Victoria Police moving to a new communications network is a lot more though than just stopping unauthorised persons accessing their communications, it is also about rectifying some of the identified shortcomings highlighted during Royal Commission into the Black Saturday fires of February 2009.

In particular interoperability issues such as those outlined by the Police Association of Victoria to the Commission on behalf of its members under ‘SYSTEMIC ISSUES – COMMUNICATIONS.”

Some of the points of concern and issues highlighted included;

“The Commission has heard a considerable amount of evidence from police in the field on 7 February about the difficulties they experienced communicating with each other and their respective communication centres. It is clear from that evidence that such difficulties were life-threatening both for police and those they helped. The uncontradicted evidence before the Commission is that such difficulties were caused by, amongst other things, the schism between police rural and urban radio networks and the scattered call-taking and dispatch facilities.’

“It is likely that such difficulties would not have arisen if two of the main initiatives supported by SIPSaCs had been met: (a) the establishment of multi-agency virtual call-taking and dispatch facilities in metropolitan and regional Victoria to service the entire State; (b) the provision of a common digital mobile voice communications system that is accessible to all public safety organisations throughout the State (in particular common to police).”2009_03_08_IMG1578CMaxwell

“Instead, on 7 February 2009 police in the field had to deal with the inability of SMR radios to communicate with MMR radios and vice-versa as well as delays caused by scattered manual call taking and dispatch facilities.’

“Superintendent Billing gave evidence that for the 2009-2010 fire season Victoria Police had put no measures in place to deal with the radio communication problems experienced by police in the field on 7 February 2009. He explained that in some cases when police from Melbourne were provided with analogue radios, the radios wouldn’t work for want of a “repeater”. The members to whom these radios were provided weren’t necessarily aware of the need for a repeater because they were used to using digital radios. This is a significant risk in circumstances where an emergency requires the deployment of members from urban locations into rural areas where the technology may be incompatible. He agreed with the proposition that such a situation was ‘downright dangerous”.

“The Chief Commissioner, Mr. Overland, gave evidence that the lack of radio resources and the inherent problems experienced by police as a consequence in the field on 7 February could occur again. He agreed with Superintendent Billing’s assertion that police from metropolitan areas who were temporarily relocated to rural areas to assist with `local’ emergency response could not be provided with analogue portable radios to facilitate their contact with the relevant communications centre because Victoria Police possessed insufficient radios.”

In May of 2015 Victoria Police made public their fears that criminals may have been listening to unencrypted Police communicators to locate possible firearms to steal. Chief commissioner Tim Cartwright revealed rural firearm officers had stopped radioing in their locations when conducting safety and licence checks for fear thieves were using the information heard to note addresses and details of where firearms may be found.

So there you have it folks, it’s happening and our days of listening to Victoria Police are coming to an end. If you’re desperate you could always dial up the odd Victoria Police HF frequency and wait for the odd transmission, you may need a lot of patience though.

Will we see a Uniden unit selected for CFA Volunteers?

There has been a lot of conjecture and discussion of late on some communication forums and those that are frequented by Country Fire Authority (CFA) Volunteers and Staff in relation to the planned new ‘listening sets’, so I’m going to add to all the conjecture! (Insert evil laughter soundtrack).

First and foremost can we please stop referring to them as ‘listening sets’? What decade are we in? Is anyone heading home in their horseless carriage to listen to the Top 40 on the wireless tonight? See what I mean?

Let’s try and use words like receiver, or scanner, like most people in the 21st Century do.

Expressions of Interest were released, discussions had, Request for Tenders released and subsequently rewritten by the looks to take into account future technology protocols, namely Phase II (TDMA) protocols.

Let’s break a few things down a little and try to sort out some of the possibilities.

It will in all probability be a handheld given they’re much easier to transport and carry around if need be. I’d be surprised if they offered a mobile/base unit given the limitations of portability and power requirements of that type.  There may however be a few possibly for use in a station environment or similar as a guess.

It will need to be able to be produced in large numbers given CFA claims of nearly 66,000 volunteers, although one would imagine that not every volunteer will want or need one, even so if only half of that number decided to purchase one that’s still nearly 33,000 units.

CFA LogoThe CFA Volunteers representative body the Volunteers Fire Brigades Victoria states in their position paper on the project that after an initial CFA purchase of 10,000 units of the former Motorola model in the 90’s that there may in fact be up to 21,000 of the former units in use. If this were true that is a fair amount of units that will need replacing. You can read their paper here: VFBV Position Paper – Listening Sets

By the way, I’m only adding this as a possibility of what may need to be catered for, I personally would be surprised, but pleased, if that many units were sold, but then again never say never.

The CFA is asking for an initial 2 units for reviewing and subsequent initial supply of 3,500 units. Although as with most things there may be some wriggle room and they may accept a few less units in the initial batch.

It will need to be able to have its profile upgraded as the CFA Channel Fleet-map and associated allocations evolve and change. How annoyed would you be if you forked out your dollars only to have the CFA change things further down the track and then 6 months after purchase the channel allocations are outdated and couldn’t be updated?

The same can be said for the fact it would appear they intend on using the receivers for monitoring of other emergency services. Which begs the question, will the State Emergency Service (SES) volunteers be offered the same deal as the CFA volunteers given they themselves may wind up on an expanded RMR Network and they can undertake like-minded activities in assisting and providing an ESO response to the community?

Obviously here I’m thinking along the lines of most current generation of scanners whereby you can simply upload updated profile by way of a computer and cable, or in some cases an SD card.

Ideally the unit should be from a company with a strong presence in Australia to support faults and failures and general product serviceability. Imagine how annoying, time-consuming and expensive it is going to be to have to send the unit overseas for repairs if it was a company with little to no presence in Australia. I think that would rule out Whistler/GRE and their current range of Phase II capable units.

The unit production is going to need to be cost-effective. Meaning it will be cheaper to modify an existing unit already under production for CFA use, if they can’t achieve this it means added cost to CFA Volunteers, the Government and subsequently the taxpayer.

I don’t see Motorola or Tait researching or modifying any of their existing gear to RX only and keeping the costs down per unit.  Yes, Motorola did do this in the past however Motorola equipment tends to be some very high-end gear and back when this previous project was undertaken it wasn’t as expensive to do given the more simplistic technology used, and Motorola did have the mainstay of supplying radio equipment to the CFA back then which would’ve made it more appealing to undertake.

bcd436hp
Will we see a variant of the Uniden BCD436HP as the preferred receiver for its volunteers?

Taking in to account what I’ve suggested above I’m tending to lean towards the already popular brand here in Australia (and worldwide for that matter), Uniden.

I’m thinking we just might see a local version of a unit already released nearly a year ago on the US, albeit here in Australia it is for a selected market only, namely those associated with the CFA and as such may have some CFA branding and ‘one offs’ so to speak.

However this may in turn mean a public release of the unit in the long run should all go well. Fingers crossed!

I do have concerns after reading the EOI and RFT published by the CFA whether they will totally achieve all functions and abilities they’re considering in the units, however I also feel on reading the documents that the CFA realise this.

If you have the means a review of the RFT document entitled “A.2 Attachment 1 Technical Specification”; states the following under Section 1.1 of the document and associated table;

Term Meaning or Definition
Must The required feature or function is mandatory
Should The required feature or function is desirable
Could The feature or function may be offered as an alternative or to enhance value
Will Not The feature or function is unacceptable.
ACMA Australian Communications and Media Authority
TGID Talk Group ID

So by using this table and on reading the CFA’s ‘function wish-list’ you start to see a few possible existing market units that whilst they don’t have all the bells and whistles initially intended they still in fact meet the intended basics of the desired unit.Page 5 of the same document I mentioned above has the following points in section;

“4. Air Interface”
“4.1 POCSAG Paging
The Monitor Receiver should be capable of receiving and decoding POCSAG paging messages at 512 bps. At least 6 CAP codes should be supported and be configurable by the user.”

and also of note is;

“4.6 P25 Paging
The receiver should support P25 paging and allow the user to configure the subscriber ID for paging.”

As you can see by the above two examples whilst the ability to perform the above is included in the wish list, by use of the word ‘should’ it is not a mandatory component. If they were mandatory the word ‘should’ would have the word ‘must’ in its place.The above two examples also appear to be the only two functions that can’t be met by the current generation of scanner I believe will be offered under this project, however this is negated by the use of the word ‘should’.

There you go, I’ve now added my bit of conjecture for some to ponder. 

Could a class action really be looming for Uniden America?

As many would be aware there has been a fair few purchasers of Uniden’s current generation of digital scanners, the BCD436HP and BCD536HP, in the US who are ready to blow a circuit or two over what they see as a failure by Uniden to provide and deliver on advertised features and functions. This is despite the scanners having nearly been available for a year, give or take a month.

Some of you may be aware there were some production issues on some batches of the initial radios that required rectification by Uniden, recently there has also been some concern on the performance on some bands of some units also, but it seems things may about to get even uglier. 

dollar-sign-live-wallpaper-2-2-s-307x512Long time readers of Radio Reference will have seen numerous threads and discussions since the launch of the radios back in November 2013, and subsequent release in January 2014 detailing pros and cons. It would seem those dissatisfied since purchasing units and after waiting for many months may now be gathering to have their day in court so too speak.

Obviously there are those who feel their purchased units are doing all they’d hoped and wished for, and are happy to forgo some of the features and functions initially advertised. But there are definitely some who feel they’ve been shortchanged on this exercise and want those features and functions which were in part part of the reason they purchased said scanner(s). Then of course there are those who do a little more with their scanners than just scan a few frequencies and like them to work that bit much harder and as such have the required functions to do so.

A website has recently been set up to act as a ‘rallying point’ for those fed up with the whole saga and can be found here: http://unidenclassaction.com/

It will be interesting to how this pans out locally for us here in Australia. One could argue that all this may still have some sort of affect on us if Uniden Australia were to considering a local release of the units here it may be placed on hold pending the outcome of any class actions elsewhere. It may be a bit of a doomsday conclusion, but one thing I’ve learned is to never say never.

Happy Scanning!

Uniden BCD436HP & BCD536HP offically launched!

So early this morning, Sunday November 17th, I dragged my sorry butt out of bed at 04:55am (AEDT) in preparation for the 5:00am announcement from Uniden regarding their new line of digital scanners. Yes I am THAT big a fan of Uniden gear! The US announcement time was for Saturday 12:00PM (CST), November 16th.

As expected two models were announced, those being the BCD536HP and the handheld variant BCD436HP. I’ve embedded the video at the end of the this article for those who missed it.

I’m not going to delve too much in to finer details simply as I’m going off a video, but will offer a few thoughts ‘at a glance’ and comment on the obvious.

I’ll also post some text pertaining to the features further below.

Both units look very nice and I love the fact they have larger displays. The addition of the date & time on the display is handy for those logging the old-fashioned way or on the run.

The desktop/mobile version, that being the BCD536HP, has the added inclusion of Wi-Fi and will have the ability to be listened to & controlled remotely via an associated App. FANTASTIC!

BCD436&536HP Launch 4Uniden BCD536HP & Wi-Fi attachment.

Born from what would appear to be a marriage between the XT series and HP-1 scanners both new release units have a nice addition in the Micro SD slot which was present on the HP-1, it can handle a card up to 32GB of capacity.

It’s very nice to have the ability to record transmissions.

Both units will be able to handle P25 Phase II (TDMA) and X2-TDMA. I don’t think there are any surprises there, what is a surprise though is the lack of ability to handle any of the other newer protocols that are either making huge inroads, or already have, to the communication field.

At the very least it would’ve been nice to see NXDN and some of the DMR protocols. Several of which are open standard. In recent years in Australia Motorola’s TRBO (DMR based) has seen a large increase in use. Even if licensing issues were raised by Motorola, it begs the question, why not at least make some of the open standard variants capable on the scanners?

BCD436&536HP Launch 3The Uniden BCD536HP & BCD436HP, big on features but no ‘big bang’ on scannable protocols?.

Is this where Uniden would wheel out the ‘cost to end-user’ explanation? Is that the only reason?

They didn’t seem too phased gouging us end users in Australia and New Zealand when they bought out the UBCD396T and UBCD996T models at $999.00 and when the US BCD variants were going at $500.00 or so USD, give or take a little.

Admittedly I’m not an engineer, just an avid scanner geek, so no I don’t know the complexities of providing the above. However ALL features in scanners over time have come from people requesting such and have been at a cost. So why are we not being heard on this?

Okay I guess you can see my disappointment, but it’s not all doom and gloom obviously. I have pointed out a few positives and there are plenty more. Watch the video and see for yourself.

Don’t get me wrong Uniden, especially you UPMan (Paul Opitz), these units look really nice and you good folks at Uniden seem to have created some units with some wonderful features, but I guess I just really had high hopes for a few more scannable protocols, and it seems I’m not alone.

I also think Uniden have done a brilliant effort on the launch of the products.

It will be interesting to see if Whistler’s purchase of the GRE Radio Scanner line and planned releases in 2014 will include a few more protocols that are able to be monitored.

The new units from Uniden are planned for release in January, 2014 and are expected to have an initial price of:

BCD436HP: $499.00 USD
BCD536HP: $599.00 USD

You can download the Owners Manual here: OM BCD436HP & 536HP

It’s too soon to see how these radios and some of their functions will transfer across to Australia and New Zealand, whether it be by users importing units or by Uniden Australia releasing units with software configured for local use.
BCD436&536HP Launch 5

Uniden BCD436HP at a glance:

bcd436hp
• 4 Gigabyte microSD card holds the entire USA and Canada database of radio systems, plus leaves room for hundreds of hours of audio recording.
• Programmable Alert LED lets you set a specific color to alert you when a channel becomes active.
• TrunkTracker V with support for APCO Project 25 Phase I and Phase II, X2-TDMA, Motorola, EDACS, and LTR Trunked Radio Systems
• Quick Key access to 100 Favorites Lists, 100 Systems per Favorites List, and 100 Departments per System.
• Discovery Modes help you find new channels on trunked systems and frequency ranges.
• Analysis Modes include Band Scope, RF Power Plot, Trunked System Analysis, and EDACS/LTR LCN Finder.
• Flexible Easy Channel Selection using Zip Code or GPS and Service Types — just pick the kinds of channels you want to hear and tell the BCD436HP where you are and let it do the rest.
• Easy Scan Control using the dedicated System, Department and Channel Hold buttons.
• Complete Front-Panel Programmability — create custom Favorites Lists either using systems from the main database as a starting point or program your systems from scratch.
• Temporary Avoid lets you quickly silence unwanted systems, departments, or channels while allowing you to restore them by cycling power.
• Backlight-on-Squelch option allows the backlight to remain on during an entire transmission.
• Date/Time indication on display with time stamping for recordings.
• Trunked and Conventional Channel Priority with Priority Do-Not-Disturb
• Close Call® RF Capture with Do-Not-Disturb automatically tunes the scanner to nearby transmissions without interrupting reception in progress.
• NOAA Weather Alert with SAME
• Two-Tone Paging with up to 32 tone slots
• Flexible Scanning — scan from any combination of the main database and Favorites Lists
• Included Sentinel Software makes database and firmware updates simple. Also allows you to create, edit, and manage your Favorites Lists.
• USB PC Connectivity – Serial GPS input for location-based scanning using the Uniden GC-GPSK or other compatible GPS receiver.
• 3 AA Battery Operation provides up to 8 hours of operation.
• SMA-type antenna.
• 192 x 160-Pixel Dot-Matrix Display
• Select/Volume/Squelch multi-control
• Side-actuated Function and Menu controls
• Backlit Display and Keypad
• Rotating Belt Clip
• Rugged construction with Rubber Side and Bottom Impact areas to improve impact resistance.
• Printed manual in the box with online updates.

Uniden BCD536HP at a glance:

bcd536HP
• 4 Gigabyte microSD card holds the entire USA and Canada database of radio systems, plus leaves room for hundreds of hours of audio recording.
• Programmable Alert LED lets you set a specific color to alert you when a channel becomes active.
• TrunkTracker V with support for APCO Project 25 Phase I and Phase II, X2-TDMA, Motorola, EDACS, and LTR Trunked Radio Systems
• Quick Key access to 100 Favorites Lists, 100 Systems per Favorites List, and 100 Departments per System.
• Discovery Modes help you find new channels on trunked systems and frequency ranges.
• Analysis Modes include Band Scope, RF Power Plot, Trunked System Analysis, and EDACS/LTR LCN Finder.
• Flexible Easy Channel Selection using Zip Code or GPS and Service Types — just pick the kinds of channels you want to hear and tell the BCD536HP where you are and let it do the rest.
• Easy Scan Control using the dedicated System, Department and Channel Hold buttons.
• Complete Front-Panel Programmability — create custom Favorites Lists either using systems from the main database as a starting point or program your systems from scratch.
• Temporary Avoid lets you quickly silence unwanted systems, departments, or channels while allowing you to restore them by cycling power.
• Backlight-on-Squelch option allows the backlight to remain on during an entire transmission.
• Date/Time indication on display with time stamping for recordings.
• Trunked and Conventional Channel Priority with Priority Do-Not-Disturb
• Close Call® RF Capture with Do-Not-Disturb automatically tunes the scanner to nearby transmissions without interrupting reception in progress.
• NOAA Weather Alert with SAME
• Two-Tone Paging with up to 32 tone slots
• Flexible Scanning — scan from any combination of the main database and Favorites Lists
• Included Sentinel Software makes database and firmware updates simple. Also allows you to create, edit, and manage your Favorites Lists.
• USB PC Connectivity
• Serial GPS input for location-based scanning using the Uniden GC-GPSK or other compatible GPS receiver.
• 64 x 288-Pixel Dot-Matrix Display
• Backlit Display and Keypad
• Printed manual in the box with online updates.

Product Launch